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Parkside School

Design Technology

Design Technology

James knew he was onto something, but it would take time to perfect his idea. 

Five years and 5,127 prototypes later, he created DC01, the world's first bagless vacuum cleaner.

 

 Mrs Stone

Head of Faculty

 Mrs Dunn

Head of KS3 Technology

 

 

 

Curriculum Plans

 

Year 7, 8 & 9

What are we studying?

Year 7

Students will complete a DT rotation as part of their year 7 carousel across the technology disciplines. Over the two-week time table students will have two double lessons and a single.

Over this rotation students will develop an understanding of how to draw like a professional using a combination of 2D and 3D techniques. This leads onto learning how to draw virtually using computer aided design software.

This is skills-based learning and will allow students to understand how professionals work and print a prototype using one of our CAM machines (laser cutter and 3D printer). Students are provided a real-life problem which through research, design, development and modelling they produce both a CAD idea for and a practical product they can take home.

Students in year 7 develop both theory and practical skills as well as wider knowledge into the environment and sustainability with the materials used.

Year 8

Students will complete a DT rotation as part of their year 8 carousel across the technology disciplines.

Over the two-week time table students will have two double lessons and a single. Over this rotation students will develop an understanding of sustainability and will design and manufacture a passive amplifier speaker for their smart phone which will increase the volume without the use of batteries/electricity. Students will learn about timbers, manufacturing methods and finishes to effectively apply to a successful practical outcome.

Learners will also develop theory knowledge on metals and produce a small pewter cast piece from a personally designed mould.

Year 9

Students will complete a DT rotation as part of their year 9 carousel across the technology disciplines. Over the two-week time table students will have two double lessons and a single.

Over this rotation students will learn core and practical skills which mirror the different areas within the GCSE course. Students will learn the theory behind polymers, timbers, metals, smart and modern materials and apply their new-found knowledge to a series of mini makes.

Students will learn how to safely and independently use new equipment and tools such as the vacuum former, line bender and brazing hearth. Students will also learn the iterative design process when generating and developing ideas through modelling using a mixture of media.

How are we assessed?

Practical work is assessed throughout the rotation and students will complete a theory assessment in week five. Students will be given skills and knowledge expectation sheets for theory and a practical success criterion at the start of the rotation to outline learning expectations.

Students will be given the opportunity to P4P theory assessments to improve their score. Practical will be assessed throughout and at the end of the rotation a practical, theory assessment and P4P score is added together and a mean mark generated.

The rotation is split 50:50 for both theory and practical assessment.

What homework are we expected to do?

Students will be given three pieces of homework per rotation (fortnightly) and this will mainly focus on design/making tasks as well as revision towards the theory assessment.

Students / parents will need to check class charts for the set homework tasks. Homework is to be completed in their independent learning books or other means stated and shown to their class teacher for marking and feedback.

What can parents do to help?

Use the skills and knowledge organiser and expectation sheets on Teams / Class charts to support revision.

Help/allow students to participate in any DIY projects at home.

Support completion of home work tasks and encourage the reading of related books/magazines or watching TV programmes e.g. inside the factory or the repair shop.

How we provide for SEN and most able students

SEND students will be supported appropriately by the staff teacher and possibly by a learning coach (where applicable). Teachers will scaffold work and model / demonstrate practical skills. Use of instructions in the form of images/not text may be used.

Students will be encouraged to work with peers to support each other in practical lessons. Use of 3B4ME.

Teachers/learning coaches may offer 1:1 support with specific practical skills. Effective and supportive use of DT technician where applicable. 

Verbal feedback will be provided during live practical lessons. 

Useful resources and equipment

Stationery – in particular drawing equipment. 

A hair bobble for tying hair up during practical lessons.

Useful online resources:

www.technologystudent.com

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/careers

Where can this subject take you? Career opportunities

Further study opportunities at Parkside (GCSE & GCE DT).

Apprenticeship

Design degrees

Creative industries

The creative industry is one of the largest in this country with a wealth of professions on offer such as interior designer, computer game designer or an architect to name just a few.

If you think about it everything you use on a daily basis has been designed. Some may have been developed and improved; whilst others are completely new!

Year 10 & 11

What are we studying?

GCSE - AQA Design and Technology (8552)

GCSE Design and Technology will prepare students to participate confidently and successfully in an increasingly technological world.

Students will gain awareness and learn from wider influences on Design and Technology including historical, social, cultural, environmental and economic factors. Students will get the opportunity to work creatively when designing and making and apply technical and practical expertise.

The GCSE allows students to study core technical and designing and making principles, including a broad range of design processes, materials techniques and equipment. They will also have the opportunity to study specialist technical principles in greater depth. KS4 Design Technology covers a wide range of topics, including materials and components, industrial and commercial processes, analysing products, designing products, technology, sustainability, ethical design and manufacture.

Over the course of two years students will develop a whole range of creative designing and making skills, technical knowledge and understanding relating to wood, metal and plastic products and invaluable transferable skills such as problem solving and time management.

A significant proportion of the course is based on practical skills focusing on creative design in order to make and produce desirable, quality products to meet the needs of clients/groups.

Time management, personal organisation, health, safety and independence of working are important areas of focus.

 Students will develop knowledge and understanding of a wide range of materials, skills and techniques in practical work focusing on designing and making, systems and control, computer aided design and manufacture (CAD/CAM), digital media and new technologies (where appropriate), analysis and evaluation of processes and products.

The areas of study within GCSE Technology are:

  • Analysis of the task and research.
  • Creative design and communication skills.
  • Production planning and quality control.
  • High quality manufacture.
  • Health and safety, tool and machine use.
  • Testing and evaluation.

 Gathering research and investigation are essential learning skills in design technology and therefore we actively encourage students to be dynamic and proactive in their use of design technology skills beyond the classroom.

How are we assessed?

Classwork (practical and theory work) and home learning is assessed throughout the course.

Students will be given success criteria and GCSE grade descriptors linked to the work.

Pupils final GCSE grade will be a combination of their controlled assessment and a written exam. Each is worth 50% of their final grade.

In year 10 students will complete a series of ‘skills building’ mini projects to best prepare them for completing their NEA Coursework.  

A mock exam for theory learnt in year 10 will be sat to determine progress made so far.

In year 11 students will select one of the three design briefs released by AQA.

Students must complete the following:

  • A NEA coursework project submitted in A3 format on 20 - 25 pages.
  •  A design and make activity starting with a design brief that fits with one of AQAs set task themes.
  •  Construction of a product designed to demonstrate a wide range of technical skills with independence, creativity and accuracy using effective time management and demonstrating competent safety procedures.
  • Use of communication techniques is also assessed, including ICT and CAD to produce the portfolio of creative skills.

Examination (GCSE)

  • Worth 50% of overall qualification
  • 120-minute examination in Year 11

What homework are we expected to do?

There will be at least one home learning task set per week, which should take around 45-60 minutes to complete. This will include research activities, work sheets, design and development work, evaluation of practical work and project-based activities.

Practise of any practical skills in the holidays or at weekends is desirable i.e. sketching practice/presentation skills, preparation.

Students need an A3 folder to store and transport their classwork and home learning to and from school.

Students are encouraged to keep up to date with all aspects of technology as well as familiarising themselves with past technology, which is either iconic, or proven and still relative today, by reading around the subject area to support their understanding and development of all its aspects, and to improve their understanding and technical vocabulary.

What can parents do to help?

  • Help/allow students to participate in any DIY projects at home.
  • Encourage the reading of related books/magazines or the watching of programmes. E.g. BBC Inside the Factory or The Repair Shop.
  • Collect a variety of interesting objects to study and or use as reference or to help generate ideas.
  • Family visits to museums (especially design/industrial) places of interest with technical interest e.g. windmills/waterwheels and more modern.
  • Ask your child to explain the meaning of the technical vocabulary that is new to each topic.

How we provide for SEN and most able students

SEND students will be supported appropriately by the staff teacher and possibly by a learning coach (where applicable). Teachers will scaffold work and model / demonstrate practical skills. Use of instructions in the form of images/not text may be used.

Students will be encouraged to work with peers to support each other in practical lessons. Use of 3B4ME.

Teachers/learning coaches may offer 1:1 support with specific practical skills. Effective and supportive use of DT technician where applicable. 

Verbal feedback will be provided during live practical lessons. 

Useful resources and equipment

Stationery – in particular drawing equipment. 

Calculator for the maths elements

A portfolio to carry home design work. A3 size.

Useful online resources:

www.technologystudent.com

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/examspecs/zby2bdm

Further information can be found from www.aqa.org.uk

Where can this subject take you? Career opportunities

Further study opportunities at Parkside (GCSE & GCE DT).

Apprenticeship

Design degree

Creative industries

The creative industry is one of the largest in this country with a wealth of professions on offer such as interior designer, computer game designer or an architect to name just a few.

 If you think about it everything you use on a daily basis has been designed. Some may have been developed and improved; whilst others are completely new!

Year 12 & 13

What are we studying?

Students will complete a two-year A level course in design technology. This course requires students to engage in both practical and theoretical study.

Year 12 will be a year spent learning core technical and design and making principles. Students will learn theory through at times practical tasks to reinforce learning.

Mini ‘skills building’ NEA tasks will be set throughout the year to develop students’ skills to best equip them for beginning their final NEA at the end of year 12/year 13.

Students will develop the ability to draw on and apply a range of skills and knowledge from other subject areas to inform their decisions in design and the application or development of technology.

Students must also demonstrate maths and science skills.

The vast majority of year 13 will see students complete their substantial design and make project which will reflect the iterative design process of research, design, develop, model and evaluate.

This A level course encourages students to:

  • Be open to taking design risks, showing innovation and enterprise whilst considering their role as responsible designers and citizens
  • Develop intellectual curiosity about the design and manufacture of products and systems, and their impact on daily life and the wider world
  • Work collaboratively to develop and refine their ideas, responding to feedback from users, peers and expert practitioners
  • Gain an insight into the creative, engineering and/or manufacturing industries
  • Develop the capacity to think creatively, innovatively and critically through focused research and the exploration of design opportunities arising from the needs, wants and values of users and clients
  • Develop knowledge and experience of real-world contexts for design and technological activity
  • Develop an in-depth knowledge and understanding of materials, components and processes associated with the creation of products that can be tested and evaluated in use
  • Be able to make informed design decisions through an in-depth understanding of the management and development of taking a design through to a prototype/product
  • Be able to create and analyse a design concept and use a range of skills and knowledge from other subject areas, including maths and science, to inform decisions in design and the application or development of technology
  • Be able to work safely and skilfully to produce high-quality prototypes/products
  • Have a critical understanding of the wider influences on design and technology, including cultural, economic, environmental, historical and social factors
  • Develop the ability to draw on and apply a range of skills and knowledge from other subject areas, including the use of maths and science for analysis and informing decisions in design.

How are we assessed?

Classwork (practical and theory work) and home learning is assessed throughout the course.

Students will be given success criteria and GCE grade descriptors linked to the work.

Pupils final GCE grade will be a combination of their controlled assessment and two written exams.

NEA = 50%

Paper 1 = 30%

Paper 2 = 20%

In year 12 students will complete a series of ‘skills building’ mini projects to best prepare them for completing their NEA Coursework. 

Mock exam(s) for theory learnt in year 12 will be sat to determine progress made so far.

At the end of year 12 into year 13 students will begin their A level NEA. Unlike the GCSE specification students can select the design problem and find a client to work alongside to solve their issue using the iterative design process.

Students must complete the following:

  • A substantial design and make NEA coursework project.
  • Written or digital design portfolio and photographic evidence of final prototype.
  • A design and make activity starting with the design problem brought to their attention by their chosen client.
  • Construction of a product designed to demonstrate a wide range of technical skills with independence, creativity and accuracy using effective time management and demonstrating competent safety procedures.
  • Use of communication techniques is also assessed, including ICT and CAD to produce the portfolio of creative skills.

What homework are we expected to do?

Weekly homework will be set which should usually take around 2-3 hours to complete.  This will include research activities, work sheets, design and development work and the evaluation of practical work. 

In addition, students are expected to use one of their dedicated study sessions within the department to develop their practical skills and work with staff.

Homework will also include Revision towards the theory assessments each half term. Students are also encouraged to read ahead and use the knowledge organisers to create their own personal revision resources.

What can parents do to help?

  • Use the skills and knowledge organiser and expectation sheets on Teams / Class charts to support revision. 
  • Help/allow students to participate in any DIY projects at home.
  • Encourage the reading of related books/magazines or the watching of programmes. E.g. BBC Inside the Factory or The Repair Shop.
  • Collect a variety of interesting objects to study and or use as reference or to help generate ideas.
  • Family visits to museums (especially design/industrial) places of interest.
  • Ask your child to explain the meaning of the technical vocabulary that is new to each topic.
  • Encourage and help students to plan their time effectively (especially the use of study sessions) and revision periods in preparation for further study at college or University.

How we provide for SEN and most able students

SEND students will be supported appropriately by the staff teacher and possibly by a learning coach (where applicable). Teachers will

scaffold work and model / demonstrate practical skills.

Their will also be scope for 1-2-1 support from departmental technicians with practical aspects of their NEA projects.

Students will be encouraged to work with peers to support each other in practical lessons. Teachers / learning coaches may offer 1:1 support with specific practical skills, step by step recipe cards will be used in all practical lessons.

Study session time will be planned (where possible) to utilise the workshop space to either work with the teacher or technician to support further.

Useful resources and equipment

Stationery – in particular drawing equipment. 

Calculator for the maths elements

A portfolio to carry home design work. A3 size.

Useful online resources:

www.technologystudent.com

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/examspecs/zby2bdm

Further information can be found from www.aqa.org.uk

Where can this subject take you? Career opportunities

Further study opportunities at Parkside (GCSE & GCE DT).

Apprenticeship

Design degree

Creative industries

The creative industry is one of the largest in this country with a wealth of professions on offer such as interior designer, computer game designer or an architect to name just a few.

 If you think about it everything you use on a daily basis has been designed. Some may have been developed and improved; whilst others are completely new!

 

Assessment & Feedback

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