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Parkside School

Film Studies

Film Studies

 Mrs Stone

Head of Faculty

 Miss Warnes

Teacher 

 

 

 

 

 

We offer opportunities to study mainstream American films from the past and present as well as a range of recent and contemporary British films, American independent films and global films, both non-English and English language.  The historical range of film represented in those films is extended by the study of silent film and significant film movements so that learners can gain a sense of the development of film from it’s early years to its still emerging digital future.  Studies in documentary, experimental and short films add to the breadth of the learning experience.  Production work is a crucial part of this specification and is integral to learners’ study of film. 

Year 12

What are we studying?

Students are introduced to the key elements of film exploring mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, sound, aesthetics and performance.  They go on to explore representations, meaning and response through studying a Global and European film.  Context of the films will be explored focusing on social, historical, institutional and financial aspects. Students will examine theories and debates behind documentary films choosing the work of one director comparing their work to three key directors.  The auteur is examined within the context of Classical and New Hollywood developing lines of argument when comparing the two films.  Context is again a major focus.  Through American Mainstream Film ideology and representation is examined with an additional focus of spectatorship.  These concepts will also be examined within Contemporary Indi Film.

Students then put their creative knowledge into a production.  

How are we assessed?

Students are assessed at the end of each unit with a essay in exam conditions.  They will have four formal assessments over the year, European Film, Global Film, Documentary, Hollywood Cinema and Contemporary Indie Film.  They will sit a mock exam at the end of the year based on Components 1 and 2. 

Assessment focuses on the students understanding of the key elements of film examining how films create meaning and response.

What homework are we expected to do?

Homework will include a very wide range of activities in year 12. Students will complete a minimum of one 500 word essay every week based on the concepts and footage studied in class that week. They then will see a wide range of activities such as watching a film, creating visual essays, completing task sheets or conducting in depth scene analysis. 

What can parents do to help?

Parents can support students by encouraging them to watch a wide range of critically acclaimed films covering a wide range of cultures and time periods.  Also, to engage students in critical debates after watching a film.  Some of our most successful students come from families who watch films together and discuss reactions and explore context by developing the ability to explore and debate.  Parents can also support students by helping them to manage their work load by monitoring classcharts.    The creation of a production is a difficult task and students would benefit from support with practicalities such as accessing exciting locations, securing props, actors etc.

How we provide for SEN and most able students

SEND students are supported within lessons by the teacher taking into consideration their specific needs.

Most able students are given tasks weekly which stretch and challenge also experience tailored questioning within class to suit their ability. 

Useful resources and equipment

 A quite place to study at home with good ICT facilities is beneficial to students.  A device to create short film is also beneficial in year 12.

Where can this subject take you? Career opportunities

When looking at the range of careers within film one might consider how often we see moving images in any given day.  Within today’s society there is immense capacity within Film studies for potential careers with many of our students have gone onto say that A level film has been pivotal in opening doors within their careers. The depth of potential employment is so varied from directing, designing, producing, technical and administration roles, and beyond.

Year 13

What are we studying?

Year 13 presents the students with the opportunity to study two British Films examining ideology and narrative.   They closely examine two key sequences revisiting and exploring the key elements of film.  Critical debates are introduced through the study of a Silent Cinema Film.  The course concludes with Experimental Film Screening again looking at the key elements of film and revisiting auteur theory and also narrative. 

How are we assessed?

Students sit their final assessment at the end of year 13

Component 1: Varieties of film and filmmaking Written examination: 2½ hours 35% of qualification Section

A: Hollywood 1930-1990 (comparative study) One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to two Hollywood films, one from the Classical Hollywood period (1930-1960) and the other from the New Hollywood period (1961-1990).

Section B: American film since 2005 (two-film study) One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to two American films, one mainstream film and one contemporary independent film. Section C: British film since 1995 (two-film study) One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to two British films.

Component 2: Global filmmaking perspectives Written examination: 2½ hours 35% of qualification.

This component assesses knowledge and understanding of five feature-length films (or their equivalent).

Section A: Global film (two-film study) One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to two global films: one European and one produced outside Europe.

Section B: Documentary film One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to one documentary film.

Section C: Film movements – Silent cinema One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to one silent film or group of films.

Section D: Film movements – Experimental film (1960-2000) One question from a choice of two, requiring reference to one film option.

Component 3: Production Non-exam assessment 30% of qualification

This component assesses one production and its evaluative analysis. Learners produce: • either a short film (4-5 minutes) or a screenplay for a short film (1600-1800 words) plus a digitally photographed storyboard of a key section from the screenplay • an evaluative analysis (1600 - 1800 words).

What homework are we expected to do?

Homework will include a very wide range of activities in year 13. Students will complete a minimum of one 500 word essay every week based on the concepts and footage studied in class that week. They then will see a wide range of activities such as watching a film, creating visual essays, completing task sheets or conducting in depth scene analysis. 

What can parents do to help?

Parents can support students by encouraging them to watch a wide range of critically acclaimed films covering a wide range of cultures and time periods.  Also to engage students in critical debates after watching a film.  Some of our most successful students come from families who watch films together and discuss reactions and explore context by developing the ability to explore and debate.  Parents can also support students by helping them to manage their work load by monitoring classcharts.    The creation of a production is a difficult task  and students would benefit from support with practicalities such as accessing exciting locations, securing props, actors etc.

How we provide for SEN and most able students

SEND students are supported within lessons by the teacher taking into consideration their specific needs.

Most able students are given tasks weekly which stretch and challenge also experience tailored questioning within class to suit their ability. 

Useful resources and equipment

A quiet place to study at home with good ICT facilities is beneficial to students. 

Where can this subject take you? Career opportunities

When looking at the range of careers within film one might consider how often we see moving images in any given day.  Within today’s society there is immense capacity within Film studies for potential careers with many of our students have gone onto say that A level film has been pivotal in opening doors within their careers. The depth of potential employment is so varied from directing, designing, producing, technical and administration roles, and beyond.

 

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