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Parkside School

Textiles

Textiles

Through its Textiles Curriculum Parkside aims to develop a passion and excitement in students for textiles through experience of a rich variety of materials and techniques.   90% of a student’s time in textiles will be spent on practical tasks developing a solid and confident skill base in the use of both sewing machines and hands on techniques.  The four assessment objectives are applied to all schemes of learning with students developing an understanding of how to respond to artists and develop ideas right from year seven.   Students are exposed to a rich variety of artists and designers from across the ages and also cultures.

 Miss Stone

Head of Faculty

Mrs Warnes

Subject Leader 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Curriculum Plans

 

 

 

Year 7, 8 & 9

What are we studying?

 Year 7

Students will complete a rotation of textiles whilst in Year 7 where they will experience a variety of materials and processes. Students will learn how to design and make a monster toy inspired by monsters from across the history of art.  They will experience needle felting, hand stitching and embroidery techniques. They are introduced to the sewing machine and will carry out designing, preparing patterns, cutting fabric, pinning, tacking and machining.

Year 8

Students will complete a rotation focusing on Textiles during Year 8 where they will consolidate learning from year 7 building on their skills. In year 8 they experience a vast array of practical techniques including wet felting, couching, beading, machine work, heat transfer paints.  The unit allows them to spend sustained periods on the sewing machine building a high level of competence.  Over the course of the unit they use the natural elements to explore, design and realise through practical activities.

Year 9

Using the British designer Alexander McQueen, the students develop work on the theme of Insects, death or reptiles.  They use CAD to create a digital design which is then transferred to satin with utilising the sublimation printer and the heart press.  Skills are then honed on the sewing machine through the creation of a range of satin samples including quilting, pleating and cording.  Hand skills developed in year 7 and 8 are built on with the Japanese technique of sashiko.  Students will again experience the whole process of exploring designing and making providing a strong base for the progression through to GCSE. 

How are we assessed?

Students are assessed on both their ability to analyse images, assimilate, design and then carrying out their design.

They receive a grade half way through the rotation and then given the opportunity to build on their skills and improve their work.

What homework are we expected to do?

There are three homework tasks set per rotation, these will be tasks linked to the learning and most likely will involve some further research to help develop their idea.

Homework will be uploaded to ClassCharts and is either to be completed in your Independent Learning book or online, dependent on the task.

What can parents do to help?

 Year 7

  • Visit art galleries, museums and exhibitions.
  • Youtube tutorials can be a lot of fun to pursue together and can help develop a passion for the subject.
  • Support your child with homework tasks and ensure they have the time to give these the correct focus.
  • Use the Knowledge Organiser to understand what your child is learning.
  • Encourage your child to discuss what they have learned during the week. 

 Year 8

  • Support your child with homework tasks and ensure they have the time to give these the correct focus.
  • Use the Knowledge Organiser to understand what your child is learning.
  • Encourage your child to discuss what they have learned during the week.

 Year 9

  • Support your child with homework tasks and ensure they have the time to give these the correct focus.
  • Use the Knowledge Organiser to understand what your child is learning.
  • Encourage your child to discuss what they have learned during the week.
  • Encourage your child to read news stories about how new and emerging technologies are influencing the field of design.
  • Encourage use of a computer or laptop at home to access TinkerCAD or Google Sketch-Up to continue their understanding of CAD drawing skills.

 

How we provide for SEN and most able students

SEND students will be supported appropriately by the teaching member of staff and where applicable, a Learning Coach.

Teaching members of staff will scaffold work and support with understanding by demonstrating practical skills and allowing ample time for these to be completed well.

Students are encouraged to work alongside their peers and offer support where possible.

Verbal feedback will be provided throughout practical and theory lessons to guide your child.

Ample opportunities for stretch and challenge presented throughout lessons to ensure students are reaching and exceeding their potential. 

Useful resources and equipment

Students who develop a passion for subject often enjoy using basic textiles equipment at home.  This might be a box of scrap material, pins and scissors, ribbons etc.

Students who particularly enjoy the subject attend Textile club after school and often work at home on a sewing machine. 

Where can this subject take you? Career opportunities

A degree in Textile and Apparel Studies could provide the education you need to pursue a career in fashion, clothing manufacturing, sales and interior design to name a few.

 Potential careers linked to textiles include:

  • Sales & retail
  • Manufacturing
  • Sports & leisure
  • Medical
  • Fashion & apparel
  • Craft
  • Footwear
  • Theatre & T.V.
  • Education
  • Armed Forces
  • Interiors
  • Toys
  • Tailoring & bespoke textiles
  • Carpets & flooring
  • Technical textiles…

  and many more!

Year 10 & 11

What are we studying?

Students will complete a two year course in Art and Design Textiles.  Over the course students explore a vast array of techniques using fabrics in ways they have never thought possible.  They will distort, manipulate, burn, construct but most essentially experiment.  Through doing this they will develop an understanding of how to create and innovate concluding with their own response to a stimulus.  Students are given opportunities to develop two garments combining both the  techniques acquired in both surface and structural design with garment construction.

Mock exam.  Work completed in year 10 leads into a 10 hour mock exam in December which then becomes part of coursework.  The mock exam is invaluable in giving the students first hand experience of realising a piece of work within a controlled and timed environment.  

Component 2 Externally Set Assignment-   Students respond to their chosen starting point from an externally set assignment paper relating to their subject title, evidencing coverage of all four assessment objectives. 

When students reach GCSE they are encouraged to support the KS3 Textiles club which is a fantastic opportunity to hone techniques and also develop communication skills. 

How are we assessed?

Assessment is continuous throughout the course across the following 4 assessment criteria:

AO1 - Develop ideas through investigations, demonstrating critical understanding of sources.

AO2 - Refine work by exploring ideas, selecting and experimenting with appropriate media, materials, techniques and processes.

AO3 - Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.

AO4 - Present a personal and meaningful response that realises intentions and demonstrates understanding of visual language.

Final assessment is based on Component 1: 60%

The portfolio, which comprises of the best unit of work from year 10 and the beginning of year 11.

Component 2: 40%

Externally set assignment.  A preparatory period followed by 10 hours of supervised time. 

What homework are we expected to do?

Homework is set weekly on Classcharts and should take approximately 1 hour. Tasks will support Components 1 and 2 and will become part of assessed coursework, it is therefore very important that they are completed. If there are any issues with tasks set or if students need to access specialist equipment they are able to use the textiles room at lunch or after school.  

What can parents do to help?

Textiles is an exciting and extremely innovative subject to study and with it comes it’s frustrations! The homework could range from finding dried seed heads to cutting 20 pieces of felt.  Support could therefore come in a variety of forms but is often particularly useful to the student following such a practical course. 

How we provide for SEN and most able students

SEND students will be supported appropriately by the teaching member of staff and where applicable, a Learning Coach.  The support may take the form of verbal guidance with exploring ideas or practical support with the sewing machines.

Teaching members of staff will scaffold work and support with understanding by demonstrating practical skills and allowing ample time for these to be completed well.

Students are encouraged to work alongside their peers and offer support where possible.

Verbal feedback will be provided throughout practical and theory lessons to guide your child.

Ample opportunities for stretch and challenge presented throughout lessons to ensure students are reaching and exceeding their potential. 

Useful resources and equipment

Students who develop a passion for subject often enjoy using basic textiles equipment at home.  This might be a box of scrap material, pins and scissors, ribbons etc.  Scrap stores are particularly useful to visit as they often present unusual and exciting materials that might not have been considered before.  Fabric shops often provide a stimulus for students with great value fabric to be found at The Shuttle in Shipley and also on the fabric stalls in Leeds Market. 

Where can this subject take you? Career opportunities

A degree in Textile and Apparel Studies could provide the education you need to pursue a career in fashion, clothing manufacturing, sales and interior design to name a few.

Potential careers linked to textiles include:

  • Sales & retail
  • Manufacturing
  • Sports & leisure
  • Medical
  • Fashion & apparel
  • Craft
  • Footwear
  • Theatre & T.V.
  • Education
  • Armed Forces
  • Interiors
  • Toys
  • Tailoring & bespoke textiles
  • Carpets & flooring
  • Technical textiles…

  and many more! 

 

Assessment & Feedback

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